Month: July 2017

Truth: The Most Destructive Idea in Human History

If you ask most people, they’d tell you that truth is a good thing. Perhaps even the best of things. However, as Shakespeare taught us and science has confirmed, there is nothing good or bad but thinking makes it so. If you think truth is good, then your mind will tell you all the reasons why it’s good. But what if you think of truth as just a thing that is neither good or bad. OR…what if you think of truth as BAD, even the worst thing in history. Well, then you get a very different picture. To be...

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Taxonomy and Quacksonomy: Pluto, The Definition of a Planet and How Your Culture Gets You Talking Out of Uranus

As an educator, you become deeply familiar with the process by which humans acquire culture and reach conclusions. Kids pick up ideas, words and attitudes all the time without knowing where they come from. The most obvious area where this shows up is with words. Kids often don’t know the meaning of words. Or they’ve heard the word and don’t know what it means. Or they’ve heard the word, think they know what it means and then find out they’ve been using it incorrectly for ages. Probably my favorite example of this comes from an experience Katie O’Brien, my...

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 Know Thy Culture: Tom Sowell and Art.

  I happen to be black. I found out what that meant in North American culture in my undergrad. I remember a discussion I had with a fellow student at the time, about why African-American students were not doing too well academically; why I never really saw other black people in the library where I worked. She explained the historical mechanisms of prejudice and because I grew up overseas, I was never subject to those same prejudices. And so, I  would never understand. I’m not really black. I didn’t share in black culture. I arrived with my own culture...

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The Death of Experts: Long Live the Wisdom of Crowds!

Back in the 1950s, very few people got a voice to speak on important matters. There were a handful of TV stations with serious-sounding journalists like Walter Cronkite and Edward R Murrow. Scientists in white lab coats were revered as trusted figures of authority. And important sounding economists played with numbers while simultaneously the economy boomed. It was a magical time. And much of that magic rested on the idea that the people in charge could be trusted. News anchors, scientists, economists and senators could be trusted. Of course, when a group of people have unchecked trust, they will abuse...

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Jobocalypse: The Next Mass Extinction Event is People’s Jobs

Biology has seen many mass extinction events. The most famous is the meteorite that wiped out the dinosaurs. Actually, there have been many mass extinctions. And while the death of the dinosaurs was tragic for them, it was actually great for us. When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, the balance of power shifted from the large, lumbering and powerful dinosaurs to the scrappy mammalian tree rats that are our ancestors. Right now, we’re living through another mass extinction event that is being brought on by our technology. Part of what’s going extinct is a staggering number of animals like the...

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RSS Mixed Mental Arts

  • Ep 358 - Reporting on Palestine: Wajahat Ali July 30, 2018
    Stay tuned until the end for some information on the re-renaming of the show to the Bryan Callen Show.
  • Ep 357 - Ancient Chinese Secrets: Ted Slingerland July 22, 2018
  • Ep 356 - A Better Way To Help: Dambisa Moyo June 24, 2018
    Dambisa Moyo is from Zambia. She's studied the effect of foreign aid on the economies of developing nations. She finds it lacking in many respects. Her new book is Edge of Chaos: Why Democracy is Failing to Deliver Economic Growth and How to Fix It. You can go to mixedmentalarts.online and click on our amazon link […]
  • Ep 355 - Learning Through Adversity: Howard Bloom June 18, 2018
    Howard Bloom developed chronic fatigue syndrome in 1988. That didn't stop him from writing a bunch of books. His most recent book is How I Accidentally Started the Sixties, which is a memoir. 
  • Ep 354 - Talking Creativity and Corgis with Allen Gannett June 11, 2018
    Allen Gannett is the author of The Creative Curve: How to Develop the Right Idea, at the Right Time and he helps debunk genius myths. That's why Hunter likes him. That's why Bryan likes him. We hope you like him too. Also, Allen loves corgis. Be sure to go to https://mixedmentalarts.online/, support us on Patreon, use our Amazon affiliate, […]

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